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router recommendations for slotting fiberglass tubes
#1
Hi folks:
I am interested in recommendations on slotting fiberglass body tubes (as well as paper ones for that matter) using a plunge cut router.
I have a wooden jig I can use, hence the plunge cut vs table mounted.
That being said I would like a model that does both plunge cuts and can be table mounted, one good quality router that can be used for other wood projects like pictures frames, molding, etc.
One I came across was this one: http://www.factoryauthorizedoutlet.com/p...-combo-kit
Any thoughts on this? What models/makes do you prefer?
Then comes the question of bits that can be used to slot FG, as well as paper.
Would these be a good choice?: http://www.mcmaster.com/#fiberglass-cutt...ts/=q7w1gk
Having never used a router, I could use some advice!
Finally, for drill bits, when working with FG, are carbide tips the best way to go to avoid splintering, etc?
Any advice would be really appreciated!
Thanks,
Greg
Greg Young - L3
NAR #42065
TRA #00234
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#2
I run a PC 892 in my CNC, it came with a plunge base too, I think.  I have a similar size Bosch in a router table.  The bosch is nice as it has slow start... both routers are variable speed.  You want variable speed.  Make sure you get something with a 1/8" collet.... might be hard to do off the shelf.  Look up "precise bits" they sell high end aftermarket collets and nuts.

The diamond cut bits are suitable for fiberglass... but you can do WAY better on price by looking up "drillman1" on ebay.  He sells new surplus out of the PCB industry at rock bottom prices. 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-1-8-1250-DIAMO...58a66bb7a2

http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-1-8-1250-CHIPB...589515f38b

The second one is what I use to cut plywood with my CNC.  Not designed for wood, but running a hair over 10k and about 60 in/minute it works great.  Traditional spiral bits make a hash out of the top surface of the plywood.  They last forever in wood, too.

Carbide is the only way to cut fiberglass.  Splintering.... starts to be a function of speeds/feeds.  The other issue is filament wound material... you're trying to cut a bunch of string.  Note on feeds/speeds:  if it chatters, feed harder or slow down the speed, high speed and low feed = burn.  The chip takes the heat away, you need to keep the chip size up.  A squealing bit is chattering... might not be able to avoid it with hand held / non rigid / slow feed though. 

Nat



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#3
Thanks for the great advice Nat! Smile
Looking at those, they look exactly like some of the bits I picked up at a train show when I was looking at odds and ends for my Dremel.
I'll have to check out what I have, although not knowing if they are carbide, I am better off to leave them for the Dremel, and get the ones from Drillman, which I know are carbide, for the router.
After reading a lot of reviews, it appears I will go with the Bosch 1617EVSPK, which is also one of the more cost effective choices...
Greg
Greg Young - L3
NAR #42065
TRA #00234
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#4
I think that's the one I run in my router table.  Solid carbide bits are fun, you can't really scratch the shanks.... one way to check.  Many, but not all, Dremel bits are not carbide.  I have one that is, it looks like an endmill except it has a dozen flutes and they're very shallow with a gentle helix.

Nat
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#5
I picked up my Bosch router today. Best price was at Lowes.
Took a look at several tables, but was not impressed. I guess I am old school, always preferring commercial grade tools and like solid metal/aluminum tables instead of ones made of phenolic plastics and mdf boards...
More than likely my table will be an internet order where better tables can be found.
Greg Young - L3
NAR #42065
TRA #00234
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#6
Check Craigslist, you can usually find the old good stuff there...

http://buffalo.craigslist.org/tls/4201849264.html
John Derimiggio
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#7
Thanks John, I never thought of that!
Greg
Greg Young - L3
NAR #42065
TRA #00234
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#8
It is a little less precise, although I find that it works pretty well to use a Dremmel 1.5" circular saw blade. Takes a lot of strength to hold the Dremmel in place, but essentially I mark off the slots, drill the appropriate sized hole on both ends of the slot with a drill press, then fire up the blade to 30,000 RPM and cut away. The 1.5" blade is long enough that the lines stay fairly straight and it is easy to start the cut by dropping down on the line.
Evan Brown
NAR# 92851
Level 2
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#9
Not having a lot of equipment or a router, I place the body tube between two 2x4's after marking my fin locations. The body tube is strapped down to prevent movement.  I then use a fine cutting circular saw for my battery powered skill saw to cut out the fin slots.  I cut even the aft end through, as I always build my fincan, and then insert it.  A bit low tech, but it works.

Jim
Jim Goggins NAR  L3
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